Thai VietJet Approaching Departure.

Thai VietJet Air (TVJA), the Thai parent company of Vietnam’s low-cost airline VietJet Air, is scheduled to take off next month.

The airline is owned by Thailand’s Kannithi Aviation (51%) and VietJet Air (49%) is expected to obtain its air operator’s certificate (AOC) from the Civil Aviation Department within the following weeks.

TVJA conducted a successful proving flight, the last part of the assessment by authorities before issuing an AOC, on Oct 25 with a flight from Bangkok to Chiang Mai and back.

Somphong Sooksanguan, president of Kannithi Aviation, said that TVJA’s launch is now imminent after a number of postponements this year. As a warm-up to regular flights, the airline will start a series of charter flights from the Thai capital to Vietnam and India on Nov 15.

Parent VietJet Air has already made available an Airbus 320-200 jet to support the launch of TVJA. The narrow-body jet, now parked at U-Tapao airport in Rayong, features a Thai flag below the cockpit’s side windows and the word Thailand below the VietJetAir logo on the tail. A second but brand-new Airbus is expected to be delivered soon after.

Pilot’s Recruitment here.
Flight Cabin Crew Recruitment here.

Capt. Ivan.

Eastern Airlines Re-launch: Now looking for Flight Attendants.

The relaunch of the once a legend Eastern Air Lines is approaching and is planned early next year, now is on the lookout for flight attendants.

The Miami-based airline will hold a recruiting session the weekend of Nov. 22. Those interested in applying must first fill out a form online, which can be found here.

Applicants must be at least 21; have a high school diploma or equivalent; be able to swim without assistance; speak, read and understand English and Spanish and have a valid passport or equivalent travel documents.

Eastern, which will initially operate as a charter airline, is awaiting certification by the Federal Aviation Administration. The airline said it plans to start operating in early 2015 with Boeing 737-800 aircraft.

Eastern Air Lines was one of the “Big Four” airlines (along with United, Delta and American that dominated the passenger airline business in the United States for nearly 50 years. It started flying officially as Eastern from 1930 (after its predecessor company was founded in 1927) and operated until 1991, when it ceased operations during the first Gulf War.

Capt. Ivan

Russian airlines hire 200 foreign pilots

The appointments were made possible thanks to a recent change in the rules. Analysts believe this decision will allow airlines to cut spending on training pilots, who have not accumulated the required amount of flight hours.

Major Russian airlines have taken advantage of a change in legislation to hire 200 foreign pilots, the Federal Air Transport Agency (Rosaviatsia), has announced.

According to an official statement circulated by the agency’s press service, the biggest number of foreign pilots have been hired by Aeroflot (a total of 80), with Russia’s second-biggest airline, Transaero, coming a close second with 67 foreign recruits.

The other airlines filed considerably fewer applications. For example, the Siberian airline Utair will be able to hire 14 foreign pilots, with KogalymAvia and Vim-AVIA, which specialize in charter flights, getting seven pilots each.

Most of the pilots will be arriving from Western Europe, the Russian business daily Vedomosti reports. For example, according to the paper, Aeroflot has hired most of its new pilots in Germany.
“Russian airlines have been lobbying for allowing foreign pilots onto the domestic market for about three years. The most interested parties were Aeroflot and Transaero, the country’s biggest carriers,” says UFS IC analyst Anna Milostnova.

According to her, the main reason behind these recent amendments to the air transport legislation is the rapid growth of the Russian aviation industry, by an average 15-20 percent a year, which has resulted in a shortage of pilots qualified to serve as captains. For example, Aeroflot estimated the shortage of first pilots at 1,000 people, Milostnova says.

In the spring of 2014, Rosaviatsia allowed Russian airlines to hire 200 foreign pilots every year over a period of five years.

Under the new procedure, airlines submitted applications for hiring foreign pilots to the Federal Air Transport Agency, while the agency decided how many pilots each airline could hire. The decision on each airline was taken through an algorithm based on the company’s air traffic in 2013, Rosaviatsia explained.

Now Rosaviatsia will hand over the applications to the Federal Migration Service (which issues work permits to foreigners) and the airlines will be able to sign contracts with foreign pilots. Further applications to hire foreign pilots can be filed next year.

Previously, Russian airlines were banned from hiring foreign pilots. However, in 2013, the ban was lifted for a period of five years. Interestingly, at first Rosaviatsia planned to hire 1,100-1,500 foreign pilots every year, but in the end, the figure was significantly cut.

“Foreign pilots must have been offered a competitive salary, which may even be higher than in Europe, and an attractive benefits package,” says leading analyst with Finam Management Dmitry Baranov.
Furthermore, he continues, a system of additional benefits may have been set up for foreign pilots. Anna Milostnova agrees.

“Russian airlines realize that in order to hire European pilots, they will have to offer them attractive conditions. Some surveys have shown that in major Russian airlines, pilots’ remuneration is in no way inferior to their European counterparts,” she says.

At the same time, experts stress, there is no shortage of pilots in Russia per se, but there is a shortage of pilots with a large number of flight hours.

“Russia did not and does not have a shortage of pilots in general. However, airlines do not seem to be prepared to spend money on retraining pilots to qualify as captains,” explains Milostnova.
In Europe, the aviation industry is more mature and grows at a slower pace than in Russia, just 5 percent a year, she continues.

“For Russian airlines, the opportunity to hire foreign pilots is, of course, a big plus. In addition to filling the gap, it will also increase completion among pilots,” Milostnova concludes.

Source & Pic: Russia & India Report

American Airlines will hire 1.500 pilots over the next five years

American Airlines says it will hire 1,500 new pilots over the next five years and offer jobs to the remaining pilots who are still furloughed.

American said Monday that it would begin posting the new jobs this week and hire 45 to 50 pilots per month through next summer. It has already started hiring 1,500 flight attendants.

Parent AMR Corp. is trying to merge with US Airways Group Inc. and exit from bankruptcy protection. The merger is being held up by an antitrust lawsuit filed by the U.S. Department of Justice. A trial is set to begin Nov. 25.

AMR CEO Tom Horton said in a letter to employees that the company was preparing for the trial but would “remain open to discussions with the Justice Department regarding a settlement on appropriate terms.”

Airlines have resumed hiring pilots in part because a large number are hitting a new mandatory retirement age of 65; it was raised from age 60 a little over five years ago. Also, new federal rules on crew rest could create the need for more pilots. American is hiring flight attendants partly to replace employees who took severance payments to leave last year.

Also Monday, AMR said in a filing with the bankruptcy court that it earned $71 million in August, a reversal from a loss of $82 million a year earlier. Revenue rose 7 per cent to $2.34 billion.

Horton said that AMR could make a profit-sharing payment to employees next March — it would be the first in several years.

“We are building a strong, competitive and profitable new American which will create more opportunity for our people,” he said.

Source:  AA

Photo Credits:  AP

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