Migrate to Asia? Boeing Projects Asia-Pacific Region To Lead the Need to Pilots and Technicians

Boeing projects the Asia Pacific region’s demand for new commercial airline pilots and maintenance technicians over the next 20 years will be 39 percent of the global need for new airline personnel.

The manufacturer projects a requirement for 216,000 new commercial airline pilots and 224,000 new technicians in the Asia Pacific region through 2033. That regional demand is forecasted to be more than North America and Europe combined.

“The Asia Pacific region is seeing tremendous economic growth and is set to become the largest air travel market in the world,” said Bob Bellitto, director, Customer Group, Boeing Flight Services. “That growth rate means booming career opportunities for those interested in becoming commercial airline pilots and maintenance technicians over the next two decades. These are strong, stable and challenging jobs in one of the most technologically advanced industries in the world.”

Leading the region in projected demand for new pilots and technicians:

• China – 98,000 pilots and 101,000 technicians
• Southeast Asia – 55,000 pilots and 55,000 technicians

Other parts of the region will also continue to see long-term demand in the tens of thousands of pilots and technicians:

• South Asia will need 33,000 pilots and 30,000 technicians
• Northeast Asia will need 17,000 pilots and 24,000 technicians
• The Oceania region will need 13,000 pilots and 14,000 technicians

As with personnel demand, the Asia Pacific region also leads the demand for new commercial airplane deliveries over the next 20 years, with 13,460 new airplanes needed by 2033 according to Boeing’s 2014 Current Market Outlook.

MH370 Pilot Depressurized the Cabin to Kill Himself, Claims Kiwi Airlines Boss

The pilot of the missing MH370 flight killed himself and his passengers by switching off the oxygen supply in what is the sixth example of such a suicide, according to an aviation expert.

Ewan Wilson, head of Kiwi Airlines, believes Zaharie Ahmad Shah planned mass murder – locking his co-pilot out of the cockpit, depressurising the cabin and shutting down all communication links before turning the plane around.

Having examined all other possibilities, Mr Wilson insists that Shah, 53, is responsible for the deaths of the 227 passengers and 12 crew members on board the doomed Malaysian Airlines flight, which disappeared on March 8.

Theory: Geoff Taylor (left) and Ewan Wilson who have written a book which claims the pilot of MH370 cut off the oxygen supply to the passengers before deliberately crashing into the Indian Ocean.

Theory: Geoff Taylor (left) and Ewan Wilson who have written a book which claims the pilot of MH370 cut off the oxygen supply to the passengers before deliberately crashing into the Indian Ocean.

And shockingly, Mr Wilson will tell British aviation experts today that there have been five other suicide flights in recent times, as he travels from New Zealand to Birmingham for a meeting, the Birmingham Mail reports.

He said: ‘There is a fundamental desire to ignore the mental health issue in the aviation industry.

Our research indicates there have been five previous incidents of murder/suicide in commercial flights over the last three decades or so, accounting for 422 lives.

The sad addition of MH370 would bring that number to 661.’

Malaysia MH370 Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah.

Malaysia MH370 Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah.

‘Mentally ill’: The book claims the most likely scenario is that pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah (above) deliberately depressurised the cabin then flew for another three hours before ditching into the sea

Although oxygen masks would have dropped down automatically from above the seats, the passengers’ supply was limited to just 20 minutes.

People unable to grab a mask, such as those sleeping, would have passed out within the space of a few minutes.

The entire ‘ghost plane’ – including her cabin crew whose air supply is only marginally longer, would have slipped into a coma and died shortly after from oxygen starvation.

Ahmad Shah, who locked his co-pilot out of the cockpit, survived long enough – either by repressurising the aircraft or from breathing his own, more extensive air supply – to evade radar and ‘execute his master plan’, Mr Wilson has concluded.

The Kiwi Airlines chief says he then made eight different course changes before allowing the jet to fly on auto-pilot for its final few hours.

He then performed a controlled ditching in the sea, which would explain why no debris has been found because the plane landed and sank in one piece.

The theory is the result of the first independent study into March’s disaster by the New Zealand-based air accident investigator, Ewan Wilson.

Mr Wilson, the founder of Kiwi Airlines and a commercial pilot himself, arrived at the shocking conclusion after considering ‘every conceivable alternative scenario’.

However, he has not been able to provide any conclusive evidence to support his theory.

An earlier report from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) also concluded that passengers may have died from hypoxia.

And Malaysian authorities previously named Ahmad Shah as their prime suspect.

The remarkable claims are made in the book ‘Goodnight Malaysian 370’, the culmination of a four-month study into the incident, which Wilson co-wrote with the New Zealand broadsheet journalist, Geoff Taylor.

Wilson, a qualified transport safety investigator, said: ‘One of our objectives in writing this book was, in some small way, to convey the human stories of the tragedy.

‘Our other, more important task was to pursue the truth about what really happened; that is one small contribution we felt we could make to this whole, terrible affair.

‘We could never have foreseen the information we uncovered, or their implications.

‘Neither could we have imagined the horrific scenario that our research suggests took place on board that fateful plane.’

Search continues
Officials claim they are ‘making progress’ as they continue to scour 60,000 sq km of sea for the plane. The orange line indicates ‘high priority’ search areas; the yellow has been searched already.

They believe that Ahmad Shah, who they have concluded was suffering from mental illness, tricked his co-pilot, father-of-three, Fariq Hamid, into taking a break about 40 minutes after take-off.

After locking Hamid out of the cockpit, Ahmad Shah made his last broadcast to air traffic control – ‘Goodnight, Malaysian 370’ – before switching off the aircraft’s air-to-ground communication links.

Alone at the controls, he took MH370 up to 39,000 feet and de-pressurised the aircraft, giving passengers and crew less than 60 seconds of Time of Useful Consciousness (TUC).

Ahmad Shah could not have prevented the plane’s oxygen masks from automatically dropping down or an automated emergency announcement in English.

But Flight 370 was a night flight and, with the cabin lights off, the majority of passengers would have been asleep, or close to it.

And for 227 of the 239 passengers, English was not their first language.

Cabin crew would have tried to help those on board, but would have had to have donned their own facemasks first.

International effort: Australia's deputy prime minister Warren Truss unveiled the latest search plan at a press conference in Canberra earlier this month. The government has contracted a new firm to take up the search.

International effort: Australia’s deputy prime minister Warren Truss unveiled the latest search plan at a press conference in Canberra earlier this month. The government has contracted a new firm to take up the search.

International effort: Australia’s deputy prime minister Warren Truss unveiled the latest search plan at a press conference in Canberra earlier this month. The government has contracted a new firm to take up the search.

‘It would have been a frightening and confusing time throughout the cabin,’ Taylor said.

‘By the time some of the passengers had woken up groggy, heard the commotion and looked around in confusion, it would have been too late for them.

‘Those passengers who did not react within 60 seconds or less would have lapsed into unconsciousness and death would have followed within four to six minutes.’

Those who had found a mask would have had between 12 and 22 minutes of breathing time before blacking out.

The cabin crew’s oxygen supply would have lasted for about 70 minutes, depending upon the height of the aircraft.

By the time MH370 returned to cruising altitude, everyone on board would have perished.

Ahmad Shah would have had three hours’ worth of oxygen – plenty enough, the authors believe, to carry out the ‘final act of his performance’.

They conclude that he set a course for the southern Indian Ocean and, after the fuel ran dry, glided the aircraft for a further 100 nautical miles before performing a controlled ditching on the surface of the water.

Wilson, a trained commercial pilot, said: ‘Ahmad Shah was a man known for his methodical, thorough nature, for his love of the technical, and probably for his ego, too.

‘This would have been his final sad act to his family and to the world: “find this one”.’ -Daily Mail

MH370 New Search Areas

MH370 New Search Areas

Sources:  DailyMail / Malaysia Chronicle / Reuters

They’ve arrived stateside! Inside a plane loaded with 195,000 new iPhones!

A pilot released a picture of the mounds of coveted electronics he says he flew into Anchorage, Alaska on MondayA A pilot released a picture of the mounds of coveted electronics he says he flew into Anchorage, Alaska on Monday

The iPhone 6 won’t be in the hands of consumers until Friday, but Apple-obsessed Americans can now rest easy knowing the long-awaited electronics have arrived stateside.

Or so says a pilot whose taken photos upon landing in Alaska of what he claims are mounds of the coveted devices in his plane’s cargo hold.

Apple Inc said many customers will need to wait until next month for their new iPhones after a record 4 million first-day pre-orders were logged, double the number for the iPhone 5 two years ago.

The company said demand had outstripped supply of the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, which feature larger screens and longer battery life.

Deliveries of pre-orders will begin on Friday and will continue through October.

Bumper first-day pre-orders point to first-weekend sales of up to 10 million units, analysts estimated.

About 2 million pre-orders were received for the iPhone 5 in the first 24 hours after it went on sale in September 2012. Apple sold 5 million of these phones in the first weekend.

Apple sold 9 million iPhone 5Ss and 5Cs, which were launched last year, in the first three days in stores. The company did not reveal pre-order numbers for these phones.

Raymond James analysts said they expect sales of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus to top 9 million in the first weekend.

1410875241814_wps_1_The_iPhone_6_won_t_be_in_

1410875323260_wps_2_The_iPhone_6_won_t_be_in_

Source:  DailyMail.co.uk & Reuters
Photos: Twitter.

 

Russian airlines hire 200 foreign pilots

The appointments were made possible thanks to a recent change in the rules. Analysts believe this decision will allow airlines to cut spending on training pilots, who have not accumulated the required amount of flight hours.

Major Russian airlines have taken advantage of a change in legislation to hire 200 foreign pilots, the Federal Air Transport Agency (Rosaviatsia), has announced.

According to an official statement circulated by the agency’s press service, the biggest number of foreign pilots have been hired by Aeroflot (a total of 80), with Russia’s second-biggest airline, Transaero, coming a close second with 67 foreign recruits.

The other airlines filed considerably fewer applications. For example, the Siberian airline Utair will be able to hire 14 foreign pilots, with KogalymAvia and Vim-AVIA, which specialize in charter flights, getting seven pilots each.

Most of the pilots will be arriving from Western Europe, the Russian business daily Vedomosti reports. For example, according to the paper, Aeroflot has hired most of its new pilots in Germany.
“Russian airlines have been lobbying for allowing foreign pilots onto the domestic market for about three years. The most interested parties were Aeroflot and Transaero, the country’s biggest carriers,” says UFS IC analyst Anna Milostnova.

According to her, the main reason behind these recent amendments to the air transport legislation is the rapid growth of the Russian aviation industry, by an average 15-20 percent a year, which has resulted in a shortage of pilots qualified to serve as captains. For example, Aeroflot estimated the shortage of first pilots at 1,000 people, Milostnova says.

In the spring of 2014, Rosaviatsia allowed Russian airlines to hire 200 foreign pilots every year over a period of five years.

Under the new procedure, airlines submitted applications for hiring foreign pilots to the Federal Air Transport Agency, while the agency decided how many pilots each airline could hire. The decision on each airline was taken through an algorithm based on the company’s air traffic in 2013, Rosaviatsia explained.

Now Rosaviatsia will hand over the applications to the Federal Migration Service (which issues work permits to foreigners) and the airlines will be able to sign contracts with foreign pilots. Further applications to hire foreign pilots can be filed next year.

Previously, Russian airlines were banned from hiring foreign pilots. However, in 2013, the ban was lifted for a period of five years. Interestingly, at first Rosaviatsia planned to hire 1,100-1,500 foreign pilots every year, but in the end, the figure was significantly cut.

“Foreign pilots must have been offered a competitive salary, which may even be higher than in Europe, and an attractive benefits package,” says leading analyst with Finam Management Dmitry Baranov.
Furthermore, he continues, a system of additional benefits may have been set up for foreign pilots. Anna Milostnova agrees.

“Russian airlines realize that in order to hire European pilots, they will have to offer them attractive conditions. Some surveys have shown that in major Russian airlines, pilots’ remuneration is in no way inferior to their European counterparts,” she says.

At the same time, experts stress, there is no shortage of pilots in Russia per se, but there is a shortage of pilots with a large number of flight hours.

“Russia did not and does not have a shortage of pilots in general. However, airlines do not seem to be prepared to spend money on retraining pilots to qualify as captains,” explains Milostnova.
In Europe, the aviation industry is more mature and grows at a slower pace than in Russia, just 5 percent a year, she continues.

“For Russian airlines, the opportunity to hire foreign pilots is, of course, a big plus. In addition to filling the gap, it will also increase completion among pilots,” Milostnova concludes.

Source & Pic: Russia & India Report

Jet Airways Pilots Launch Their Own Website for Incident Analysis

Criticizing sections of the media for misreporting on a recent incident involving loss of altitude by a plane, the pilot’s union of Jet Airways today said it is forming a “technical site” to provide the right perspective on civil aviation issues.

The National Aviation Guild (NAG), the Jet pilots’ union, said a 2,900ft drop in altitude by a Jet Airways Boeing 777 last month was erroneously reported as a 5,000ft plunge by the media.

It said while the reasons for the sudden loss of altitude by the flight are still being investigated, the loss of altitude at 800ft per minute “is less than prescribed for a controlled radar environment.”
Stories about the 5,000 ft drop got circulated due to the media’s reliance on a “publicity hungry” official from the civil aviation regulator DGCA, it alleged.

The Captain was having his “controlled rest” and was not breaking any norm, while the first officer was also not playing on her tablet as being reported, adding that the tablets are used as a working tool by all pilots.
“We would request you not to conduct a trial by media. We would request you to follow the principles of natural justice and give a fair chance to the all the pilots,” it appealed to the media.

In order to get the right perspective across on such events, the union said it is sensitive to the difficulties on analysis faced by the media, which generally goes to retired military aviators for the perspective.
Stating that issues in civil aviation are different in nature, it decided to set up a technical site to comment on
happenings in the civil aviation sector.

“We have formed a technical site which consists of type rated examiners of most types of aircraft flown in India and would be able to provide a more authentic version of the events that happen in the civil aviation sector in India,” it said in the statement.

A Jet Airways plane from Mumbai to Brussels, with around 280 passengers on board, had lost altitude over the Turkish airspace in early August.

Terming it a “serious incident”, aviation regulator DGCA had suspended the two pilots and initiated a probe into the incident.

Source & Pic:  Economic India Times

FAA Bans US Based Carriers to Stop Flying over Syria

The FAA – Federal Aviation Administration, has ordered airlines based in the United States to stop flying over Syria, citing a “serious potential threat” to civil planes.

The FAA ordered last Monday to all airlines based in the United States to stop flying over Syria, citing a “serious potential threat” to civil planes, including armed groups with anti-aircraft weapons.

“Based on an updated assessment of the risk associated with such operations and the lack of any requests from operators wishing to fly in this airspace, we believe it prudent to prohibit US operators from flying into, out of and over Syria,” the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said in a statement. The FAA’s previous so-called Notice to Airmen had strongly advised US operators against flying over Syria.

“The ongoing armed conflict and volatile security environment in Syria poses a serious potential threat to civil aviation,” the new notice said. “Armed extremist groups in Syria are known to be equipped with a variety of anti-aircraft weapons which have the capability to threaten civilian aircraft.” It noted that opposition groups have already shot down Syrian military aircraft over the conflict that began nearly three and a half years ago.

The ban affects all US companies and commercial operators. The FAA has also imposed a ban on US planes over Iraq, effective Aug 8.

Syria, like Iraq, is on a path that carriers can take when traveling between Europe and the Middle East or Asia.

Source:  AFP

The Stabilized Approach.

For several years the highest percentage of incidents and accidents has occurred during the approach and landing phases. According to a Flight Safety Foundation study, 46 percent of the 250 worldwide accidents of the period 2002-2011 happened during approach, landing or go-around.

Although operators can specify different minimums criteria for deciding to continue the approach or execute a go-around, on their Approach and Landing Accident Reduction (ALAR) Briefing Note 7-1, the FSF suggests that the approach must be stabilized 1000ft. AGL on IMC and 500ft AGL on VMC. An approach is considered stabilized when:

• The aircraft is on the correct flight path.
• Only small changes on heading and pitch are necessary to maintain the correct flight path.
• The airspeed is not more than VREF + 20 IAS and not less than VREF.
• The aircraft is on the landing configuration.
• Sink rate is not more than 1000ft/min. If an approach requires a sink rate of more than 1000ft/min, should be noted on the approach briefing.
• Power/Thrust is appropriate for the actual aircraft configuration and not below the minimum required for the approach according to the AOM.
• Approach briefing and all necessary checklists have been conducted.
• Specific type of approaches are stabilized if they also fulfill the following
• ILS approaches should be flown within one dot of the localizer and glide slope.
• A category II or III approach must be flown within the expanded localizer band.
• During a Circling Approach wings should be level on final when the aircraft reaches 300ft above airport elevation.
• Unique approach conditions or abnormal conditions requiring a deviation from the above elements of a stabilized approach require a special briefing.

Stabilised Approach Gates

Stabilized Approach “Gates”

If anyone of these elements are not met by 1000ft above airport elevation on IMC or 500ft above airport elevation on VMC, requires and immediate GO-AROUND.

Contributing factors to create an unstabilised approach can be adverse weather, being placed by ATC in an uncomfortable position for the approach, runway illusions during a night approach with no vertical guidance, being high or too close to the runway during a circling maneuver.

Continuation of an unstabilized approach can lead to several situations like; cross the runway threshold too fast and/or too high, not be aligned with the runway centerline, leading to land long on the existing runway, or a runway excursion.

Build your own defenses; adhere strictly to SOP’s and if for some reason not listed here you don’t feel comfortable with the approach execute a go-around, prepare for a new approach and start again. Don’t allow anyone to rush you.
Happy Landings!!

 

Capt. Ivan

Recommended Reading:

Boeing Forecasts a Rising Demand of Pilots and Technicians

Boeing predicts a continued strong growth in demand for commercial aviation pilots and maintenance technicians as the global fleet expands over the next 20 years.

Boeing’s 2014 Pilot and Technician Outlook, released today at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, projects that between 2014 and 2033, the world’s aviation system will require:

• 533,000 new commercial airline pilots
• 584,000 new commercial airline maintenance technicians

“The challenge of meeting the global demand for airline professionals cannot be solved by one company or in one region of the world,” said Sherry Carbary, vice president, Boeing Flight Services. “This is a global issue that can only be solved by all of the parties involved—airlines, aircraft and training equipment manufacturers, training delivery organizations, regulatory agencies and educational institutions around the world.”

The 2014 outlook projects continued increases in pilot demand, which is up approximately 7 percent compared to 2013; and in maintenance training, which increased just over 5 percent. Pilot demand in the Asia Pacific region now comprises 41 percent of the world’s need, and the Middle East region saw significant growth since last year’s outlook due to increased airline capacity and orders for wide-body models which require more crew members.
Overall, the global demand is driven by steadily increasing airplane deliveries, particularly wide-body airplanes, and represents a global requirement for about 27,000 new pilots and 29,000 new technicians annually.
Projected demand for new pilots and technicians by global region:

• Asia Pacific – 216,000 pilots and 224,000 technicians
• Europe – 94,000 pilots and 102,000 technicians
• North America – 88,000 pilots and 109,000 technicians
• Latin America – 45,000 pilots and 44,000 technicians
• Middle East – 55,000 pilots and 62,000 technicians
• Africa – 17,000 pilots and 19,000 technicians
• Russia and CIS – 18,000 pilots and 24,000 technicians

 

Boeing Media Room

AVIATION – The Invisible Highway

AVIATION: THE INVISIBLE HIGHWAY is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world. The documentary is produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (“One Six Right”), narrated by Harrison Ford, and features an original score by Academy Award-winning composer James Horner. It’s scheduled for a 2015 release.

Website:  aviationtheinvisiblehighway.com

Capt. Ivan

Barefoot Pilots, When Life is About Adventure!

Unfortunately, if you type “barefoot pilots” on wiki, the first result that will pop out is the story of a convicted criminal known as Colton Harry Moore.

Nothing more unfair, reality is that the Barefoot Pilots are a community of seaplane pilots with an amazing job! Although there are dozens of places all over the world were the BP operates, there’s a place that offers all the magic of flying in the paradise: The Maldives.

The immense archipelago that makes up the Maldives lies south-west of the southern tip of India and spans a vast area of the west Indian Ocean. With an area of about 90,000 square kilometers, yet less than 0.5 per cent of it being dry land, the Maldives is one of the most distinct countries in the world, a unique place in the world, with a truly amazing landscape, a paradise for a vacation, where sands are white as the smiles of the locals, where fish swim happily in the warm waters of the Indian Ocean, where the weather is a dream, and the deep rays of the sun wait to engulf you their arms.

Trans Maldivian Airways started on 1989 operating helicopters only. The transition to seaplane-only was completed on 1999, after merging with Maldivian Air Taxi, together, the two airlines, operate 44 seaplanes including three new DHC-6-400 series and conduct well over 100,000 flights per year making them the world’s largest Twin Otter operator on land or sea. Together the companies employ around 900 people and service more than 60 resorts, safari boats and liveaboards.

Meet Maria… Our Paradise Barefoot Pilot!

A Day at The Flying Office!

Capt. Ivan

  •   GDL 39