Migrate to Asia? Boeing Projects Asia-Pacific Region To Lead the Need to Pilots and Technicians

Boeing projects the Asia Pacific region’s demand for new commercial airline pilots and maintenance technicians over the next 20 years will be 39 percent of the global need for new airline personnel.

The manufacturer projects a requirement for 216,000 new commercial airline pilots and 224,000 new technicians in the Asia Pacific region through 2033. That regional demand is forecasted to be more than North America and Europe combined.

“The Asia Pacific region is seeing tremendous economic growth and is set to become the largest air travel market in the world,” said Bob Bellitto, director, Customer Group, Boeing Flight Services. “That growth rate means booming career opportunities for those interested in becoming commercial airline pilots and maintenance technicians over the next two decades. These are strong, stable and challenging jobs in one of the most technologically advanced industries in the world.”

Leading the region in projected demand for new pilots and technicians:

• China – 98,000 pilots and 101,000 technicians
• Southeast Asia – 55,000 pilots and 55,000 technicians

Other parts of the region will also continue to see long-term demand in the tens of thousands of pilots and technicians:

• South Asia will need 33,000 pilots and 30,000 technicians
• Northeast Asia will need 17,000 pilots and 24,000 technicians
• The Oceania region will need 13,000 pilots and 14,000 technicians

As with personnel demand, the Asia Pacific region also leads the demand for new commercial airplane deliveries over the next 20 years, with 13,460 new airplanes needed by 2033 according to Boeing’s 2014 Current Market Outlook.

Boeing Responds to Al Jazeera English Documentary on 787

Boeing issued the following statement prior to the airing of the television program on Al Jazeera English. The company will not be providing any further comment.

We have not been afforded the opportunity to view the full program, but the promotional trailer and published media reviews suggest that what has been produced is as biased a production as we have seen in some time. It is unfortunate that the producers of this television program appear to have fallen into the trap of distorting facts, relying on claims rejected by courts of law, breathlessly rehashing as “news” stories that have been covered exhaustively in the past and relying on anonymous sources who appear intent only on harming The Boeing Company.
When first contacted by the producers, we accommodated them in order for them to produce a fair and objective report including facilitating factory access, interviews and providing full and open responses to their questions. The 787 is an outstanding airplane delivering value to our customers, but we have also talked candidly in public about its challenging development process. There are no tougher critics about our early performance than Boeing.

Unfortunately, the reporting team appears to have chosen to take advantage of our trust and openness and abused their position from the outset by deliberately misrepresenting the purpose, objective and scope of their planned coverage.

This specious production appears to have ignored the factual information provided by Boeing and instead based the majority of its reporting on unnamed sources pursuing their own agendas and a disgruntled former employee engaged in a legal dispute with Boeing. In one instance, the producers resorted to ambush tactics normally seen only in tabloid-style TV news. The anonymous sources the TV program depends on are clearly working with those who seek to harm Boeing and its workers. They appear to have no real interest in truth, safety or better informing the public.

Even on-the-record sources seem to have changed their stories for the producers. For example, former Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA) President Cynthia Cole said this about the 787’s first flight in 2009: “Today’s flight is a testament to the skill, hard work and diligence Boeing employees put in to get this airplane ready to fly,” SPEEA President Cynthia Cole said in a news release. “Boeing returned to engineering, and that’s what made today possible and successful.” Now, she states in the documentary trailer that Boeing “shortchanged the engineering process.”

Instead of an objective view of the 787’s development, viewers and our employees will see a television program that is neither balanced nor accurate in its portrayal of the airplane, our employees, or our suppliers. This program and those involved with it do a disservice to the hard-working men and women of Boeing and our supplier partners who designed and build the 787.

Furthermore, the program presents a false impression of Boeing South Carolina and the quality of work performed there. Airplanes, whether delivered from South Carolina or Washington, meet the highest safety and quality standards that are verified through robust test, verification and inspection processes. Our data of the current 787 fleet in service show parity in the quality and performance of airplanes manufactured in both locations.

Source:  Boeing Media Room

 

Boeing Forecasts a Rising Demand of Pilots and Technicians

Boeing predicts a continued strong growth in demand for commercial aviation pilots and maintenance technicians as the global fleet expands over the next 20 years.

Boeing’s 2014 Pilot and Technician Outlook, released today at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, projects that between 2014 and 2033, the world’s aviation system will require:

• 533,000 new commercial airline pilots
• 584,000 new commercial airline maintenance technicians

“The challenge of meeting the global demand for airline professionals cannot be solved by one company or in one region of the world,” said Sherry Carbary, vice president, Boeing Flight Services. “This is a global issue that can only be solved by all of the parties involved—airlines, aircraft and training equipment manufacturers, training delivery organizations, regulatory agencies and educational institutions around the world.”

The 2014 outlook projects continued increases in pilot demand, which is up approximately 7 percent compared to 2013; and in maintenance training, which increased just over 5 percent. Pilot demand in the Asia Pacific region now comprises 41 percent of the world’s need, and the Middle East region saw significant growth since last year’s outlook due to increased airline capacity and orders for wide-body models which require more crew members.
Overall, the global demand is driven by steadily increasing airplane deliveries, particularly wide-body airplanes, and represents a global requirement for about 27,000 new pilots and 29,000 new technicians annually.
Projected demand for new pilots and technicians by global region:

• Asia Pacific – 216,000 pilots and 224,000 technicians
• Europe – 94,000 pilots and 102,000 technicians
• North America – 88,000 pilots and 109,000 technicians
• Latin America – 45,000 pilots and 44,000 technicians
• Middle East – 55,000 pilots and 62,000 technicians
• Africa – 17,000 pilots and 19,000 technicians
• Russia and CIS – 18,000 pilots and 24,000 technicians

 

Boeing Media Room

FAA Orders Boeing to Fix a Software Glitch on the 747-8 Fleet with GE Engines

747-8 GE Engines

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday ordered an immediate fix to the latest version of Boeing Co’s 747-8 plane, saying a software glitch could cause it to lose thrust when close to landing and fly into the ground.

The FAA’s so-called airworthiness directive covers Boeing’s 747-8 and 747-8F planes with certain General Electric engines. It calls for replacing defective software with a new, improved version.

The rule, the fourth such directive involving the 747-8, directly affects seven airplanes in the United States, the FAA said.

If adopted internationally, the rule would cover a larger number. Boeing’s website said it had delivered 66 of the four-engine jets, the company’s largest, to customers worldwide since the model was introduced in October 2011.

The problem never caused a problem in flight, Boeing said.

Because of the seriousness of the safety issues, the directive takes effect April 9, skipping the usual comment period, although comments can still be submitted, the FAA said.

Boeing said data analysis indicated a potential problem, and it advised customers last year to update the software. It said it believed the majority of operators had already done so.

The risk of failure was “extremely remote,” Boeing said.

GE said it owned the software and jointly analyzed it with Boeing, but plane maker decided to recommend the software change to customers.

According to the FAA, the risk arises when a plane is changing back into “air mode” while performing a “rejected or bounced landing.” That change halts hydraulic pressure used to stow the engine thrust reversers, which slow the plane on landing, the agency said.

Without hydraulic pressure, the reversers may not stow fully and might redeploy, which “could result in inadequate climb performance at an altitude insufficient for recovery, and consequent uncontrolled flight into terrain,” the FAA said.

Unidentified business jet/VIP customers own the eight passenger models of the aircraft in the United States, according to Boeing’s website. Air cargo company Atlas Air is the largest U.S. commercial owner of the jet, with a fleet of eight 747-8F freighters.

Among passenger carriers, Lufthansa is the largest operator, with 11. It said its planes were unaffected by the directive.

“GE has confirmed that all our engines already have the software update that is required by the FAA,” a spokesman said on Wednesday.

China’s Cathay Pacific has 13 freighters and Cargolux, based in Luxembourg, has nine.

Korean Airlines Co, Nippon Cargo Airlines Co Ltd and Volga-Dnepr UK Ltd also own 787-8F freighters, according to Boeing’s website.

Source:  Reuters.

Photo:  Reuters

 

Nok Air to order Boeing 737 MAX

Thailand’s Nok Airlines is close to placing an order for Boeing 737 MAX.

The deal for the latest version of Boeing’s best-selling passenger jet, the 737 MAX, is expected to be announced at next week’s Singapore Airshow.

Both the airline and the manufacturer declined to comment.

The order could be worth between $1.5 and $3 billion and contrasts with concerns that aviation could be swept up in Thailand’s political and economic uncertainty which has helped fuel a recent slide in emerging markets.

Nok Air, 39.2 percent owned by Thai Airways International PCL THAI.BK, competes with Air Asia’s, Thai venture Asia Aviation PCL AAV.BK, a venture backed by Indonesia’s Lion Air and Bangkok Airways Co. Ltd BA.BK.

The new order would be the first major aircraft deal for Nok Air, which listed in Thailand in June in order to renew its fleet and which is expanding domestic and international routes.

Two sources said the airline’s requirements could include as many as 28 of the 737 aircraft family, but another said barely half of the total would be ordered directly from Boeing.

“Leasing companies will provide part of Nok’s requirements. Nok is looking at a number of arrangements as they need the aircraft,” said a further source familiar with the deal.

Nok Air operates 14 Boeing aircraft in its fleet of 21, with the remainder comprising ATR and Saab aircraft.

Source: Reuters

 

Building the Boeing 747-8 – Worlds Longest Airliner – Video

The Boeing 747-8 is a wide-body jet airliner developed by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Officially announced in 2005, the 747-8 is the fourth-generation Boeing 747 version, with lengthened fuselage, redesigned wings, and improved efficiency. The 747-8 is the largest 747 version, the largest commercial aircraft built in the United States and the longest passenger aircraft in the world.

The 747-8 is offered in two main variants: the 747-8 Intercontinental (747-8I) for passengers and the 747-8 Freighter (747-8F) for cargo. The first 747-8F performed the model’s maiden flight on February 8, 2010, with the 747-8 Intercontinental following on March 20, 2011. Delivery of the first freighter aircraft occurred in October 2011; passenger model deliveries began in 2012. In July 2013, confirmed orders for the 747-8 totaled 107, including 67 of the freighter version, and 40 of the passenger version.

Capt. Ivan

Boeing Brings the 787-9 to Kiwi Soil.

Boeing picked the ideal location for the 787-9 Dreamliner to make its international debut in the flight-test program. The newest member of the Dreamliner family flew nonstop from Seattle to Auckland – the longest 787-9 flight to date — to pay a visit to launch customer Air New Zealand.

“Boeing is proud to bring the 787-9 to Auckland to show Air New Zealand what the team has achieved,” said Mark Jenks, vice president, 787 Development, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “With more than 150 flights and since testing began in September, the test fleet continues to perform very well, and we look forward to delivering the first 787-9 in mid-2014 as promised.”

With the 787 set to become a staple of Air New Zealand’s long-haul fleet, this visit was an opportunity for the airline’s technical and flight crews to get hands-on time with the 787-9. Air New Zealand employees explored the airplane side by side with their Boeing partners — a unique opportunity not just to see their airplane, but to view a 787-9 configured for testing, unlike anything they would see in service.

“Having one of Air New Zealand’s 787-9s touch down on Kiwi soil for the first time is hugely exciting,” said Christopher Luxon, chief executive officer, Air New Zealand. “It’s a real reminder that we will soon welcome the first of these more modern, fuel-efficient aircraft into our fleet.”

The airplane, ZB002, is the second of three 787-9s dedicated to the test program, which began last September. As the only 787-9 test airplane to be fitted with elements of the passenger interior, in addition to test racks and instrumentation, Boeing uses ZB002 to test the environmental control system and other aspects of airplane performance. After the test program is complete, the airplane will be reconfigured for delivery to Air New Zealand.

The 787-9 will complement and extend the 787 family. With the fuselage stretched by 6 meters (20 feet) over the 787-8, the 787-9 will fly up to 40 more passengers an additional 555 kilometers (300 nmi) with the same exceptional environmental performance — 20 percent less fuel use and 20 percent fewer emissions than similarly sized airplanes. The 787-9 leverages the visionary design of the 787-8, offering passengers features such as large windows, large stow bins, modern LED lighting, higher humidity, a lower cabin altitude, cleaner air and a smoother ride.

Boeing is on track to deliver the first 787-9 to Air New Zealand in mid-2014. Twenty-six customers from around the world have ordered 402 787-9s, representing 39 percent of all 787 orders.

By Adam Tischler, Tim Bader, and Julie O’Donnell

Boeing Media Room

Finally, the 777X will be built in Washington

A key Boeing labor union narrowly approved late Friday an eight-year contract that keeps production of the new 777X jet airliner in Washington state in exchange for cuts in benefits.

As a result, Boeing will stop seeking alternate sites for production of a more fuel-efficient version of its best-selling widebody jet.

The Machinists Union District Lodge 751 said in a statement that members approved the controversial contract by 51 percent.

The union vote means that Boeing will carry out final assembly and wing fabrication on the 777X at their sites in Puget Sound, in northwestern Washington state.

“It was a tough vote, a hard situation, splitting the membership,” Mark Johnson, a national level official with the International Association of Machinists (IAM), told reporters.

The 777X is a new version of Boeing’s successful 777 twin-engine widebody jet, which is built today in Everett. It is scheduled to come into service around 2020, and the company has already received billions of dollars in advanced orders.

Boeing, founded in Seattle in 1916, has more than 82,000 employees in Washington state, making it the region’s largest private employer. A move elsewhere would likely have devastated the area economy.

Source:  France – Presse

Boeing 777X, Unfolding the Future of Flight

The 777X will be the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world, with 12 percent lower fuel consumption and 10 percent lower operating costs than the competition.

The 777-9X will have the lowest operating cost per seat of any commercial airplane. It will offer a range of 8,200 nautical miles (15,185 km) and seat more than 400 passengers. The 777-8X will compete directly with the A350-1000 and will boast an incredible range of up to 9,300 nautical miles (17,220 km) with seating for 350 passengers.  The 777X is scheduled to enter service in 2020.

Like the 787 Dreamliner which was launched as the 7E7, the 777X will be formally named at a later date.

Details & Specifications:

                                                               777-8X                 777-9X

Market Offer Ability

May 2013

May 2013

Program Launch

Nov 2013

Nov 2013

Seats

350 Passengers

400 Passengers

Range

More than 9.300 NM (17.200 kms)

More than 8.200 NM (15.185 kms)

Wingspan in Flight

233 ft – 5 in (71,1 mt)

Wingspan on Ground

212 ft – 9 in (64,9 mt)

Folding Wingtip

Enables 21 ft (6 mt)

Interior

Lager windows, wider cabin, new lighting, new architecture.

Configuration

Twin Aisle

Engine

GE9X, supplied by GE Aviation

List Price

349,8 Million

377,2 Million

 

Capt. Ivan

Boeing 747-8 an 787 Dreamliner – High Altitude Icing

Fifteen airlines have been warned about the risk of ice forming on Boeing’s new 747-8 and 787 Dreamliner.

The issue – affecting some types of engines made by General Electric when planes fly near high-level thunderstorms – prompted Japan Airlines to cancel two international routes.

There have been six incidents since April when aircraft powered by GE engines lost power at high altitude.

The Boeing 747-8 series and the new 787 Dreamliner are the only types of aircraft affected by the high-altitude icing issue.

The new warning was given to airlines including Lufthansa, United Airlines and Japan Airlines.

It says aircraft with the affected engines – GE’s GEnx – must not be flown within 50 nautical miles of thunderstorms that may contain ice crystals.

As a result, Japan Airlines (JAL) has decided to withdraw Dreamliners from service on the Tokyo-Delhi and Tokyo-Singapore routes.

“Boeing and JAL share a commitment to the safety of passengers and crews on board our airplanes. We respect JAL’s decision to suspend some 787 services on specific routes,” a Boeing spokesman said, according to Reuters news agency.

A GE spokesman told the agency the aviation industry was experiencing “a growing number of ice-crystal icing encounters in recent years as the population of large commercial airliners has grown, particularly in tropical regions of the world”.

He said GE and Boeing were hoping to eliminate the problem by modifying the engine control system software.

British airways use Rolls Royce engines on their Dreamliners. They are not affected by the warning, says the BBC’s Ben Geoghegan.

Despite the issues, the Dreamliner is still considered to be one of the most advanced planes in the industry and remains popular.

Boeing has received orders for more than 1,000 jets since its launch.

Last month, it announced plans to raise production of the 787 Dreamliner to 12 per month by 2016.

That would be an increase from its target for the end of this year of 10 planes a month.

Source:  Reuters

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