Thai Lion Air First Officer Faints in Flight and Later Dies

A Thai Lion Air B737-900 performing flight SL8537, from Hat Yai (Thailand) to Bangkok Don Mueang Intl. Airport, with 152 passengers on board, was forced to return to Hat Yai after the First Officer lost consciousness 20 minutes after takeoff.

The flight had departed from Hat Yai at 12:15PM and was 20 minutes into the flight when First Officer Peter Esberte collapsed. Director of Operations of the airline, Capt. Worawut Kongkositkul confirmed that the 47-year-old Dutch pilot died while he was being taken from the airport to a hospital.

Mr Worawut said Peter joined the low-cost airline at its launch last year and was healthy with no record of health problems. His latest medical check-up in February and March showed no signs of problems.

After Peter collapsed, the Captain declared an emergency and turned back towards Hat Yai airport, landing safely at 1:21PM.

Aeronautical Radio of Thailand confirmed that Peter died of a heart attack on the airplane.

 

Capt. Ivan

FAA Bans US Based Carriers to Stop Flying over Syria

The FAA – Federal Aviation Administration, has ordered airlines based in the United States to stop flying over Syria, citing a “serious potential threat” to civil planes.

The FAA ordered last Monday to all airlines based in the United States to stop flying over Syria, citing a “serious potential threat” to civil planes, including armed groups with anti-aircraft weapons.

“Based on an updated assessment of the risk associated with such operations and the lack of any requests from operators wishing to fly in this airspace, we believe it prudent to prohibit US operators from flying into, out of and over Syria,” the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said in a statement. The FAA’s previous so-called Notice to Airmen had strongly advised US operators against flying over Syria.

“The ongoing armed conflict and volatile security environment in Syria poses a serious potential threat to civil aviation,” the new notice said. “Armed extremist groups in Syria are known to be equipped with a variety of anti-aircraft weapons which have the capability to threaten civilian aircraft.” It noted that opposition groups have already shot down Syrian military aircraft over the conflict that began nearly three and a half years ago.

The ban affects all US companies and commercial operators. The FAA has also imposed a ban on US planes over Iraq, effective Aug 8.

Syria, like Iraq, is on a path that carriers can take when traveling between Europe and the Middle East or Asia.

Source:  AFP

The Stabilized Approach.

For several years the highest percentage of incidents and accidents has occurred during the approach and landing phases. According to a Flight Safety Foundation study, 46 percent of the 250 worldwide accidents of the period 2002-2011 happened during approach, landing or go-around.

Although operators can specify different minimums criteria for deciding to continue the approach or execute a go-around, on their Approach and Landing Accident Reduction (ALAR) Briefing Note 7-1, the FSF suggests that the approach must be stabilized 1000ft. AGL on IMC and 500ft AGL on VMC. An approach is considered stabilized when:

• The aircraft is on the correct flight path.
• Only small changes on heading and pitch are necessary to maintain the correct flight path.
• The airspeed is not more than VREF + 20 IAS and not less than VREF.
• The aircraft is on the landing configuration.
• Sink rate is not more than 1000ft/min. If an approach requires a sink rate of more than 1000ft/min, should be noted on the approach briefing.
• Power/Thrust is appropriate for the actual aircraft configuration and not below the minimum required for the approach according to the AOM.
• Approach briefing and all necessary checklists have been conducted.
• Specific type of approaches are stabilized if they also fulfill the following
• ILS approaches should be flown within one dot of the localizer and glide slope.
• A category II or III approach must be flown within the expanded localizer band.
• During a Circling Approach wings should be level on final when the aircraft reaches 300ft above airport elevation.
• Unique approach conditions or abnormal conditions requiring a deviation from the above elements of a stabilized approach require a special briefing.

Stabilised Approach Gates

Stabilized Approach “Gates”

If anyone of these elements are not met by 1000ft above airport elevation on IMC or 500ft above airport elevation on VMC, requires and immediate GO-AROUND.

Contributing factors to create an unstabilised approach can be adverse weather, being placed by ATC in an uncomfortable position for the approach, runway illusions during a night approach with no vertical guidance, being high or too close to the runway during a circling maneuver.

Continuation of an unstabilized approach can lead to several situations like; cross the runway threshold too fast and/or too high, not be aligned with the runway centerline, leading to land long on the existing runway, or a runway excursion.

Build your own defenses; adhere strictly to SOP’s and if for some reason not listed here you don’t feel comfortable with the approach execute a go-around, prepare for a new approach and start again. Don’t allow anyone to rush you.
Happy Landings!!

 

Capt. Ivan

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A350 XWB route proving: Visiting 5 Southern Hemisphere airports

Airbus’ MSN005 developmental A350 XWB jetliner continues on the third trip of its global route-proving tour to demonstrate the aircraft’s readiness for airline operations. In this phase, the aircraft received warm welcomes in Johannesburg, South Africa; Sydney, Australia; Auckland, New Zealand; Santiago, Chile then flew to Sao Paulo, Brazil before returning to Toulouse, France.

Boeing Forecasts a Rising Demand of Pilots and Technicians

Boeing predicts a continued strong growth in demand for commercial aviation pilots and maintenance technicians as the global fleet expands over the next 20 years.

Boeing’s 2014 Pilot and Technician Outlook, released today at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, projects that between 2014 and 2033, the world’s aviation system will require:

• 533,000 new commercial airline pilots
• 584,000 new commercial airline maintenance technicians

“The challenge of meeting the global demand for airline professionals cannot be solved by one company or in one region of the world,” said Sherry Carbary, vice president, Boeing Flight Services. “This is a global issue that can only be solved by all of the parties involved—airlines, aircraft and training equipment manufacturers, training delivery organizations, regulatory agencies and educational institutions around the world.”

The 2014 outlook projects continued increases in pilot demand, which is up approximately 7 percent compared to 2013; and in maintenance training, which increased just over 5 percent. Pilot demand in the Asia Pacific region now comprises 41 percent of the world’s need, and the Middle East region saw significant growth since last year’s outlook due to increased airline capacity and orders for wide-body models which require more crew members.
Overall, the global demand is driven by steadily increasing airplane deliveries, particularly wide-body airplanes, and represents a global requirement for about 27,000 new pilots and 29,000 new technicians annually.
Projected demand for new pilots and technicians by global region:

• Asia Pacific – 216,000 pilots and 224,000 technicians
• Europe – 94,000 pilots and 102,000 technicians
• North America – 88,000 pilots and 109,000 technicians
• Latin America – 45,000 pilots and 44,000 technicians
• Middle East – 55,000 pilots and 62,000 technicians
• Africa – 17,000 pilots and 19,000 technicians
• Russia and CIS – 18,000 pilots and 24,000 technicians

 

Boeing Media Room

AVIATION – The Invisible Highway

AVIATION: THE INVISIBLE HIGHWAY is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world. The documentary is produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (“One Six Right”), narrated by Harrison Ford, and features an original score by Academy Award-winning composer James Horner. It’s scheduled for a 2015 release.

Website:  aviationtheinvisiblehighway.com

Capt. Ivan

Barefoot Pilots, When Life is About Adventure!

Unfortunately, if you type “barefoot pilots” on wiki, the first result that will pop out is the story of a convicted criminal known as Colton Harry Moore.

Nothing more unfair, reality is that the Barefoot Pilots are a community of seaplane pilots with an amazing job! Although there are dozens of places all over the world were the BP operates, there’s a place that offers all the magic of flying in the paradise: The Maldives.

The immense archipelago that makes up the Maldives lies south-west of the southern tip of India and spans a vast area of the west Indian Ocean. With an area of about 90,000 square kilometers, yet less than 0.5 per cent of it being dry land, the Maldives is one of the most distinct countries in the world, a unique place in the world, with a truly amazing landscape, a paradise for a vacation, where sands are white as the smiles of the locals, where fish swim happily in the warm waters of the Indian Ocean, where the weather is a dream, and the deep rays of the sun wait to engulf you their arms.

Trans Maldivian Airways started on 1989 operating helicopters only. The transition to seaplane-only was completed on 1999, after merging with Maldivian Air Taxi, together, the two airlines, operate 44 seaplanes including three new DHC-6-400 series and conduct well over 100,000 flights per year making them the world’s largest Twin Otter operator on land or sea. Together the companies employ around 900 people and service more than 60 resorts, safari boats and liveaboards.

Meet Maria… Our Paradise Barefoot Pilot!

A Day at The Flying Office!

Capt. Ivan

30 Airplanes in 3 Minutes

Over 30 airplanes in 3 minutes. A must see for anyone interested in airplanes. Great shots of Early Flight, WWI, The Golden Age, WWII, modern era and spacecraft, demonstrate the breadth and depth of FLYING TV! Time: 3:10