Australian Exploration Company Claims MH370 Wreckage Found in Bay of Bengal.

An Australian exploration Company has claimed that it found the wreckage of missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 in the Bay of Bengal.

Six weeks after its departure from Kuala Lumpur bound for Beijing and disappearance and after the most extensive and fruitless search on aviation history, an Adelaide based Australian exploration Company has claimed the possible wreckage of the missing airliner was found in the Bay of Bengal, 5000 kms away from current location search.

Australian GeoResonance said on Monday they have located the possible wreckage after covering 2000.000 sq/km of the possible crash zone, north of MH370 last known location. To analyze the obtained data, they used satellite imagery, images obtained from aircraft and other diverse technologies.

“The technology we use was originally designed to find nuclear warheads and submarines. Our team in Ukraine decided we should try and help” Said, the company spokesman, David Pope.

“The wreckage wasn’t there prior to the disappearance of MH370. We are not trying to say it definitely is MH370. However, it is a lead we feel should be followed up” He added.

Pavel Kursa, another GeoResonance member, mentioned that several elements usually carried by airliners were detected at the location.

“We identified chemical elements and materials that make up a Boeing 777, these are aluminium, titanium, cooper, steel alloys and other materials” said Mr. Kursa to Australian channel 7News.

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Capt. Ivan

Photo Credits:  Reuters / Andrew Barr – National Post

Flight Training A350 XWB by Airbus

Airbus A350 XWB

The introduction of innovative training for Airbus’ next-generation A350 XWB jetliner is reinforcing the company’s focus on pilot competencies. To provide self-paced functional learning for theory and practice, the Airbus Cockpit Experience (ACE) trainer utilizes a “learning by discovery” approach. Hands-on training is also introduced at an early stage with the Airbus Pilot Transition (APT) trainer and Full Flight Simulator (FFS).

MH370 Too Many Questions, Not a Single Response.

News from MH370 goes slowly fading from media agencies, websites and other social media. But the world seems reluctant to accept that the most modern airliner flying these days can disappear without a trace.

During these days passengers, friends and colleagues made me the same question: – Do you have any idea what could have happened with Malaysia Airlines?  The answer was always the same: – No, honestly no idea…

We live in the internet age, where as far as we know our private life is not private anymore. Where virtually there’s no place in the world that is not accessible to a human being. Constellations of satellites listen to our conversations through our phones, on the street and even inside our homes. Our emails can be read, the book you are holding in your hands can be read, if we sit outside or near a window. The Rover is scrutinizing Mars commanded by a computer from the Earth. We have traveled to the deepest pit of the oceans; we have climbed the highest mountain in the world. And the most advanced aircraft flying through the skies in the era of modern aviation disappears and nobody knows where it is?

The issue is so serious that even the president of the most powerful nation on earth traveled to Malaysia to give explanations on the matter. The world cannot accept this situation.

Since his disappearance, we heard all kinds of speculations about what might have happened to the doomed flight. All kind of experts and so called experts gave their opinion and elaborated hypothesis, even an important news agency mounted a show inside of a flight simulator of the missing plane trying to explain what could have happened. Lovers of intrigue also made their contribution, locating the lost aircraft in different places or islands with hijacked or executed passengers.

The search area is huge and a few hours ago it has been expanded even more, the cost of the search is colossal. But here’s at stake is the dignity of the human race, our brothers have been lost and the world will do everything in its power to unravel the mystery. We must speak honestly and respond that until the plane is not found and the black boxes analyzed will not know exactly what happened that night with the doomed flight.

The truth is that, in deference to the pain of the families who still retain a hope of finding their loved ones and the silent heroes that every day continue the search. We must admit that we don’t know what could have happened with MH370.

Capt. Ivan

 

Red Bull Helicopter Aerobatics by Chuck Aaron

Chuck Aaron defies physics as he takes to the skies in the Red Bull Aerobatic Helicopter. Loops, barrel rolls, and death defying maneuvers are all in a days flight for this world class helicopter pilot.

Experience the world of Red Bull like you have never seen it before. With the best action sports clips on the web and YouTube exclusive series, prepare for your “stoke factor” to be at an all-time high.

E- Aircrafts, The Future of General Aviation?

With the raising costs of fuel and in an effort to reduce carbon emissions produced by air travel, a combined project between the European agency EADS, Siemens and Diamond Aircraft is providing an answer in what will be the future electric airplane.

The group has developed two training aircraft in cooperation with Aero Composites Saintonge – ACS the E-Fan and the E-Star 2.

The E-Fan is a two seat training aircraft made entirely of composite materials, has a length of 6,7 mts, a wingspan of 9,5 mts. and a max takeoff weight of 1220 lbs.

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An interesting concept of the E-Fan is the use of an additional rear-wheel drive that allows the airplane to taxi without using the main engines and to accelerate up to 38MPH during takeoff.

An important limitation of the E-Fan to be solved in the future is the reduced time able to stay in flight with full charged batteries, only 45-60 min.

E-Fan Specifications:
– Type: Training Aircraft
– First Flight: 11 MAR 2014
– Engines: (2) Electric Turbines of 1,5 KN.
– Length: 6,7 mts.
– Wingspan: 9,5 mts.
– Seats: 2
– Power Source: 2 (Li-Po) Lithium Polymer Batteries
– Max Takeoff Weight: 550 kgs. – 1220 lbs.
– Max Cruise Speed: 137 MPH
– Endurance: 60 min.

The Diamond DA36 E-Star is a hybrid electric motor glider resulting from the evolution of the DA HK36 Super Dimona.

The DA36 E-Star is powered by a 70KW electric motor which receives electricity from a generator operated by a small Wankel engine, as an additional source of power, the airplane relies on a battery to provide extra power for takeoff and climb.

Fliegen mit Siemens Integrated Drive System / Flying with Siemens Integrated Drive System

Diamond DA36 E-Star Specifications:

– Type: Motor Glider
– First Flight: 8 JUN 2014
– Engine: Siemens 70KW (94HP) – Primary Source.
– Wingspan: 16 mts.
– Seats: 2
– Power Source: 40HP Austro Engines Wankel – Secondary Source.
– Max Takeoff Weight: 770 kgs. – 1698 lbs.
– Max Cruise Speed: 171 MPH
– Max Glide Ratio: 27:1 at 65 MPH

 

Capt. Ivan

A Rusty Pilot Goes Back in the Air

I remember a phrase that I heard some years ago “the sky always going to be there, waiting for you”.

This can be the case of Mark Luetkemeyer, of Plano, Texas. Thanks to AOPA Rusty Pilots Initiative, Mark returned back to the air after being inactive as pilot for more than 25 years.

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Mark’s flying desires began when his dad used to take him to the Jefferson City [Memorial] airport” in Missouri, where he learned to fly in the mid-1960s, he said. “I got my certificate when I was 24 while in the Navy, where I was an intelligence officer.”
Meanwhile he was in the military he earned his instrument and multiengine ratings and obtained a Commercial and Instructor Pilot Certificate, logging more than 1.500 hrs. at the moment he stopped flying.

Mark’s decision to stop flying is the reason why many young people get away from aviation and postpone their dream: Money.
Although Mark stopped flying, he didn’t went too far from airplanes, in the 1990’s he worked for a Company named Flexjet in Dallas airport as IT programmer. Later he also worked for a Piper and Gulfstream contractor.
Last spring Mark told his wife about his desires to go flying again “If you want to talk about rusty pilots, that’s me. I’ll be 63 this fall, and a few years ago, I got prostate cancer,” he said.

After obtaining his third class medical, he joined the RFC Dallas Flying Club at Addison airport, the club has three Beechcrafts and two Piper Cherokees.

Luetkemeyer started his flight training in July and finished it in December. “I flew twice a week for six weeks, which helps you bring back and retain muscle memory. This helps you get back in the saddle quicker,” he said. “Then from late August until December I flew about once a week. I did my cross country in late December.” Now, he’s working on getting his instructor certificate back, “so once I do finally retire, I can flight instruct on the side.”

The RFC Flying Club played an important role in bringing Mark back to fly again “I could not have done it without them. The club gave me access to better aircraft that are more suitable for cross-country work. And I wanted to get my ticket back so I could fly from point A to point B,” he said. “There’s a great deal of camaraderie in the club [which] has 100 active and nearly 200 total members.”

The reward, both for him and his wife, was when he flew from Addison to Memphis, Tenn., over Christmas. “It was my wife’s first ride in a GA aircraft”.

Luetkemeyer said he probably spent around $4,300 to get current again, including $3,000 in aircraft rental hours, $600 in instructor fees, the club deposit and initiation fee, and club dues of $360. “It takes persistence, especially if you’re over 60 like me and have medical problems. But if you want to do it, you can.”

Capt. Ivan

NBAA Releases an Update for Its Crew Rest Guidelines

The National Business Aviation Association – NBAA, has released an update to its guidelines for crew rest in business aviation first published 17 years ago. The new suggested limits are the result of recent scientific researches about human reaction to fatigue.

“We developed these guidelines after significant scientific review, extensive analysis of industry practices and industry feedback,” said Leigh White, president of Alertness Solutions and lead of NBAA’s Fatigue Task Force. “Our goal was to present the latest data and guidance to company and flight department management to help educate them about how to best use their crews.”

The investigation result is a 16-page report that reflects the effects of working at different hours of day it covers important topics like fatigue management and provides tables to compute flight time, duty time and rest periods.

This publication, developed the NBAA Safety Committee’s Fatigue Task Force and a host of industry experts, is intended to be a practical tool for flight departments that is easy to understand, implement and incorporate in any operator’s flight operations manual.

Capt. Ivan

Boeing Delivers 8.000th 737 to United Airlines


With the successful rate increase to 42 737s per month under their belts, employees in the 737 program recently took a short break from building airplanes to celebrate their latest successes.

Local government officials and suppliers from around the world attended the event, and heard how the 737 team simultaneously improved safety and quality while getting ready to build more airplanes each month.

“The past year has been a busy one for the program. You not only worked on increasing production for the third time in four years, you also improved quality and made our site safer,” said Beverly Wyse, 737 vice president and general manager.

“Improving safety and quality — two goals at the top of our list — help increase our productivity,” Wyse said. “That’s what it takes to stay competitive in the current environment.”

The event featured a performance by ILuminate, dancers who perform in the dark to create illuminated characters — including 737s. A United Airlines airplane formed the stage’s backdrop, as Ron Baur, vice president Fleet for United Airlines, joined Wyse.

United will receive the 737 program’s 8,000th delivery this week, and Baur emphasized how important quality and reliability are for customers.

“Quality means delivering airplanes on schedule with no defects, not delivering airplanes on time with issues,” Baur said.  If airplanes aren’t ready to go directly into service when they are delivered, it costs the airline money, disrupts schedules and hurts the reputation of both companies, he said.

Baur’s message hit home with Marius Mean of 737 Quality Assurance.
“We have a lot of pride in what we do and we’re working to make sure that every plane that comes out is defect-free,” Mean said.

Baur also thanked the 737 employees for building more great airplanes.

“As we aggressively replace our older, less efficient airplanes, United Airlines is counting on you to build dependable airplanes, and increasing the rate to 42 airplanes-per-month allows us to do this even faster,” said Baur.

 

Source:  Boeing Media Room

 

Ocean Floor Search for MH370 Interrupted Again

The search for a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 deep in the Indian Ocean was again cut short on Wednesday when technical problems forced a U.S. Navy underwater drone to surface without finding anything, officials said.

While a massive air and sea search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 is continuing almost 2,000 km (1,200 miles) off the coast of Perth, hopes have been pinned on the Bluefin-21 autonomous underwater vehicle finding the first concrete sign of the plane in more than six weeks of hunting.

A Chinese Ilyushin IL-76 aircraft prepares to fly out from Perth International Airport, to participate in the continuing search in the southern Indian Ocean for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.Malaysian authorities have still not ruled out mechanical problems as causing the Boeing 777’s disappearance, but say evidence suggests it was deliberately diverted from its scheduled route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.An aircraft’s black box records data from the cockpit and conversations among flight crew and may provide answers about what happened to the missing plane.

A unspecified technical problem meant the Bluefin resurfaced early on Wednesday and analysis of the sonar data downloaded showed no significant detections, the Australian agency leading the search said.

It has subsequently been relaunched to continue its search.

The drone was forced to end its first deployment early on Monday after it exceeded its 4.5 km (14,750 feet) depth limit in the remote stretch of ocean where search authorities believe the jetliner crashed after its disappearance on March 8 with 239 people on board.

The introduction of the Bluefin marks a methodical, slower paced new phase of the search, now in its 40th day and described by the search coordinator, retired Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, as the most expensive in aviation history.

U.S. Naval personnel have said the drone could take up to two months to scour a 600 sq km area where the plane is believed to have sunk.

The deep sea area now being searched, the Zenith Plateau, has never been mapped in detail because it is not in any country’s economic zone.

However the sea floor is likely covered in “foraminiferal ooze”, a sludge formed by microscopic marine organisms, which would show up any large metallic object clearly, James Cook University marine geologist Robin Beaman told Reuters.

“A sidescan is very good at detecting the difference in the acoustic return of a hard object versus a soft, muddy sea floor,” he said. “This is quite a good environment for looking for wreck debris, albeit deep.”

An air and sea search for floating debris continued on Wednesday, but Houston has indicated that will soon end.

Up to 11 military aircraft, three civil aircraft and 11 ships would help in Wednesday’s search, covering a total area of about 55,151 square km in rainy conditions.

Authorities have targeted the remote stretch of ocean based on four acoustic signals they believe are from the plane’s black box recorders.

Source:  Reuters

Photo:  Reuters

 

Search for MH370 – MiniSubmarine Emerges with Empty Hands From First Dive

A U.S. Navy underwater mini-submarine sent to search for a missing Malaysian jetliner on the floor of the Indian Ocean could take up to two months to scour a 600 sq km area where the plane is believed to have sunk, U.S. search authorities said on Tuesday.

The U.S. Navy’s Bluefin-21 autonomous underwater vehicle is deployed from the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield in the southern Indian Ocean

The prediction coincided with the end to the abbreviated first mission by the Bluefin-21 autonomous underwater vehicle six hours into what was meant to be a 16-hour operation on Monday after it exceeded its 4.5 km (14,750 feet) depth limit and was automatically returned to the surface.

The introduction of the undersea drone marks a new slower paced phase in the search for Malaysia Airlines MH370 which disappeared on March 8 and is presumed to have crashed thousands of km (miles) off course with the loss of all 239 people on board.

Authorities, who soon plan to scale back the air and surface search, are confident they know the approximate position of wreckage of the Boeing 777, some 1,550 km (960 miles) northwest of Perth, and are moving ahead on the basis of four acoustic signals they believe are from its black box recorders.

But having not heard a “ping” for almost a week and with the batteries on the locator beacons two weeks past their 30-day expected life, the slow-moving “autonomous underwater vehicle” was launched on Monday to try and locate wreckage.

“The AUV takes six times longer to cover the same area as the towed pinger locator. It is estimated that it will take the AUV anywhere from six weeks to two months to scan the entire search area,” Lt. J.G. Daniel S. Marciniak, a spokesman for the U.S. Seventh Fleet, said in a statement.

From its aborted first mission, the Bluefin-21 produced six hours of data which authorities analyzed to find no objects of interest, Marciniak added. The drone was expected to embark on its second search mission late on Tuesday.

The robot, which takes two hours to descend another two to return to the surface, as well as several hours to download data, will build up a detailed acoustic image of the area using sophisticated “sidescan” sonar. It hopes to repeat its success in finding a F-15 fighter jet which crashed off Japan last year.

It is capable of spending up to 16 hours scouring the sea floor. If it detects possible wreckage, it will be sent back to photograph it in underwater conditions with extremely low light.

Officials are focusing their acoustic search on an area equivalent to a medium-sized city – 600 sq km (230 sq miles). But the much broader search area off the Australian coast covers about 60,000 sq km, according to the government.

The deep sea area now being searched, the Zenith Plateau, has never been mapped in detail because it is not in any country’s economic zone.

However the sea floor is likely covered in “foraminiferal ooze”, a sludge formed by microscopic marine organisms, which would show up any large metallic object clearly, James Cook University marine geologist Robin Beaman told Reuters.

“A sidescan is very good at detecting the difference in the acoustic return of a hard object versus a soft, muddy sea floor,” he said. “This is quite a good environment for looking for wreck debris, albeit deep.”

The Bluefin’s main challenge was to remain within 50 meters (165 feet) of the seabed to ensure the best quality sidescan detection without exceeding its 4.5 km depth limit which could risk damaging it, Beaman said.

Malaysian authorities have still not ruled out mechanical problems as causing the plane’s disappearance, but say evidence suggests it was deliberately diverted from its scheduled route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

An aircraft’s black box records data from the cockpit and conversations among flight crew and may provide answers about what happened to the missing plane.

The search for the missing plane is on track to be the most difficult and expensive search and recovery operation in aviation history.

Source:  Reuters

Photos:  Reuters

 

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